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News

84% Indians Check Phones Within 15 Minutes Of Waking Up: Report

The report also found that an average smartphone user picks up their phone almost 70 to 80 times a day.

By - Hera Rizwan | 15 Feb 2024 12:45 PM GMT

As per a recent study conducted by the Boston Consulting Group, 31% of the waking hours for Indians are dedicated to smartphones, with 84% of users checking their devices within the first 15 minutes of waking up.

The report highlights the notable change in human behaviour brought about by the significant increase in smartphone usage over the last 13 years in India. As per the report, individuals now pick up their smartphones without a specific purpose almost half of the time, signifying a substantial shift in daily routines.

The study analysed smartphone usage data from over 1,100 consumers over a 30-day period, taking into account age, gender, income, zone, and city tier. The sample was structured to mirror the demographics of India's internet population. The methodology encompassed one-on-one interactions, in-person interviews, and discussions within focus groups.

'Over 50% smartphone users pick them up without thought'

Highlighting an average individual's equation with their smartphone in the Indian scenario, the report states that a significant portion of the country's population experienced their initial internet access without going through the conventional desktop phase commonly observed in developed countries. Instead, users directly adopted mobile devices, driven by the affordability of smartphones and the widespread availability of cheap data. Today, the usage of internet has clocked 71% and shows "no sign of slowing down".

Experiencing a substantial rise in usage time from approximately 2 hours to 4.9 hours, smartphones have significantly broadened their impact on people's daily routines. Currently, the primary use case is streaming content, accounting for more than 50% of the total time spent.

The report highlighted that a typical smartphone user engages with their phone almost 70 to 80 times daily. Furthermore, the report identified socialising, shopping, searching, and gaming as the other top activities for consumers to allocate their smartphone time.

Additionally, around 84 per cent of users check their phone within 15 minutes of waking up, said the report.

The research divides how people use their phones into three types: Pre-Determined, Exploratory, and Spontaneous. As per the report, approximately 55% of the time, consumers lacked a clear intent when reaching for their phones, while 50% of the time, they were well-defined in their tasks. Additionally, the report noted that for 5 to 10% of instances, consumers had only partial clarity about why they accessed their phones.

Consequences of excessive smartphone usage

The advent of technological wonders, like smartphones, has significantly enhanced the convenience of modern life. However, this convenience is not without a price. There is compelling evidence suggesting that excessive smartphone usage can lead to addiction, resulting in severe health issues for both adults and children. The consequences of smartphone addiction manifest in various forms, including fatigue, diminished cognitive function, and reduced self-esteem, among other concerns.

According to a report by World of Statistics, India ranked 17th on the list of countries with highest rate of smartphone addiction. Not only mental health, the widespread use of smartphones and similar devices is more pronounced in children and is now casting a shadow on the relationship they have with their parents.

As per a report titled, ‘Impact of Smartphones on Parent-Child Relationship’, in India, a staggering 94 per cent of parents expressed worry about their children’s mental health due to excessive phone use, with 91 per cent advocating for restrictions.

The impact on relationships is also evident, as 90 percent of parents experienced irritation owing to their phone-distracted children. This resulted in a reduction in the quality of time spent together and an increase in loneliness for the children.

Moreover, 87 percent and 73 percent of parents respectively begin and end their day by checking their phones, reflecting comparable behavior seen in children. Although they spend only two hours together, 75 percent acknowledge using their phones during this time, leading to shared feelings of guilt regarding the quality of their relationship.

This addiction also manifests itself in extreme consequences. For instance, in a tragic incident last year, a 16-year-old boy in Mumbai took his own life after his father confiscated his smartphone. Worried about the persistent gaming, the father confiscated the boy's cellphone and directed him to go to bed. Upset, the boy, who had previously expressed intentions of self-harm in comparable circumstances, tragically took his own life that night.